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Factoids

Factoids offer brief snapshots of current topics pertinent to the Furniture industry based on our on-going research. Increase your grasp of current trends, consumer attitudes, and shifts within the industry through solid statistics and concise insight.

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Factoids

Do Election Years spur Industry Growth? U.S. Presidential Terms (1997 to 2016) Furniture Industry Sales Growth Over Previous Year

This is the first factoid in a series of five factoids exploring the possible connection between election years and a healthy economy. Looking back over the past 20 years and the elections those years encompassed yields interesting results. With the exception of the Great Recession in 2008, a possible heightened sense of confidence and hope for the future during election years may partly be responsible for higher furniture sales growth, consumer confidence, gross domestic product and lower unemployment rates.

In presidential elections over the last 20 years since 1997, the last year of each term with one exception, has produced the highest furniture industry sales growth of all four years of that presidency. The one exception was the second term of George W. Bush which ended during the Great Recession. The last year of each term is also the Election Year for next term, as the nation is experiencing now in 2016. If the pattern continues, 2016 should grow in excess of the 5.3% furniture sales growth of last year.

This factoid shows the furniture industry growth by year over 20 years encompassing five presidential terms, including the current 2016 election. Note that the industry’s highest growth was in the last years of Bill Clinton’s second term and George Bush’s first term. Our next factoid will show the link between election years and consumer confidence.

Source: Impact Consulting Services/ FurnitureCore.com

Markets Finally Recovering to Pre-Recession 2007 Sales Levels

This is the final factoid in a series of four factoids detailing the Furniture Industry’s recovery from the Recession to finally meet and exceed pre-recession peak sales of 2007. The majority of the positive growth in 2015 occurred in large Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s), while many Micropolitan Statistical Areas (Micro SA’s) and Rural Areas are still struggling to make a full recovery.

Segmenting MSAs by industry sales range gives another perspective of market performance. Not surprisingly, the MSAs with Industry Sales over $1 Billion are having the highest percent of sales exceeding 2007 levels in 2015. With only 14 of the 401 total MSAs, the highest sales bracket exceeded pre-recession sales in 10 of those markets which accounted for 73.7 percent of those industry sales.

MSA’s in the top two industry ranges (over $500 Million) were responsible for roughly 63 percent of total sales surpassing pre-recession levels in 2015. All in all, the MSA’s within the largest industry sales ranges have pushed the Furniture and Bedding Industry out of the recession.

Source: Impact Consulting Services Proprietary Model

Markets Finally Recovering to Pre-Recession 2007 Sales Levels Industry Sales in 2015 by Region

This is the third factoid in a series of four factoids detailing the Furniture Industry’s recovery from the Recession to finally meet and exceed pre-recession peak sales of 2007. The majority of the positive growth in 2015 occurred in large Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s), while many Micropolitan Statistical Areas (Micro SA’s) and Rural Areas are still struggling to make a full recovery.

Breaking up the MSA markets by region shows that the Northeast is still struggling to return. It is the only region in which majorities of the MSA’s are falling short of pre-recession sales. While over 50 percent of MSA’s in the Midwest and South have recovered in industry sales, the West is topping the country with over 70 percent of MSA’s exceeding 2007 peak sales.

The percent of markets by region exceeding 2007 sales does not exactly correlate with the percent of region sales by market type. Despite the fact that less than half of MSA’s in the Northeast had sales in 2015 that exceeded 2007, the New York-Jersey City-White Plains MSA (a division of the broader New York CBSA) helped pushed percent of sales in 2015 past the 2007 level for the region. Likewise in the Midwest, the Chicago-Naperville-Arlington Heights MSA division has yet to fully recover – impacting the poorer sales performance of its region.

Markets Finally Recovering to Pre-Recession 2007 Sales Levels Industry Sales in 2015 Percent by Market Type

This is the second factoid in a series of four factoids detailing the Furniture Industry’s recovery from the Recession to finally meet and exceed pre-recession peak sales of 2007. The majority of the positive growth in 2015 occurred in large Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s), while many Micropolitan Statistical Areas (Micro SA’s) and Rural Areas are still struggling to make a full recovery.

In 2015, the industry as a whole finally exceeded 2007 peak sales but many markets are yet to fully recover. Out of 937 total markets, 533 have surpassed 2007 sales and 404 are still fighting their way back. Forty-two percent of MSA’s fell short of 2007 levels and Micro SA’s have similar numbers with 43.7 percent below the peak sales of 8 years before.

The Percent of Sales chart shows the percent of industry sales in markets that are thriving versus the markets that are still playing catch-up. The markets exceeding 2007 peak levels account for over 61 percent of industry sales with MSA’s and Micro’s have similar outcomes.

Source: Impact Consulting Services Proprietary Model

Markets Finally Recovering to Pre-Recession 2007 Sales Levels Retail Furniture & Bedding Sales 2007 to 2015

This is the first factoid in a series of four factoids detailing the Furniture Industry’s recovery from the Recession to finally meet and exceed pre-recession peak sales of 2007. The majority of the positive growth in 2015 occurred in large Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA’s), while many Micropolitan Statistical Areas (Micro SA’s) and Rural Areas are still struggling to make a full recovery.

The Furniture Market trudged through eight years of recession and slow growth to finally dig out and surpass the performance in 2007. The industry plummeted 17.4 percent in two years, but it took another six years to recover and grow 24.4 percent to sales of $92.2 Billion in 2015.

In both 2007 and 2015, MSA’s control 90.6 percent of industry sales with smaller Micropolitan Statistical Areas totaling 6.2 percent and the remaining 3.2 percent spread among the rural areas. All three market types are now above 2007 levels. MSA’s took a nosedive in 2009 – dropping 17.7 percent as Micro SA’s and Rural Areas decreased 14.4 and 13.6 percent. While the larger markets had the greatest declines, they have also made the biggest comeback – growing 24.8 percent in comparison to 20.4 percent and 20.9 percent in the smaller markets and rural areas.

Source: Impact Consulting Services Proprietary Model

Sales analysis is provided by Impact Consulting Services, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia and is part of a proprietary model that tracks retail furniture and bedding sales at the market level. Sales include bedding, upholstery, bedroom, dining room, occasional, outdoor, and other miscellaneous furniture items. Sales tax is excluded. Data for all years is calculated based on current market geographical boundaries.


Industry Sales by Quarter 2009 Q1 to 2016 Q1 (Preliminary) Bedding Industry

Industry Sales by Quarter 2009 Q1 to 2016 Q1 (Preliminary) Bedding Industry

Bedding sales in the first quarter of this year grew 5.1 percent over the same Q1 in 2015   totaling an estimated $3.56 billion.  Compared to the last quarter (2015 Q4) which is traditionally Bedding’s lowest performing period, sales were up 16% percent. 


Industry Growth Quarter to Quarter 2013 Q1 to 2016 Q1 (Preliminary) Bedding Industry

 

After a poor fourth quarter last year, Bedding sales in the first quarter of 2016 were up 5.1 percent quarter over quarter totaling $3.56 billion. 

Industry Sales 2008 to 2016 Q1 (Preliminary) Bedding Industry


First quarter Bedding sales totaled $3.57 billion, up 5.1 percent from the same quarter last year.

Industry Sales by Quarter 2009 Q1 to 2016 Q1 Furniture & Bedding

Industry Sales by Quarter 2009 Q1 to 2016 Q1 Furniture & Bedding

The Industry experienced its customary first quarter dip compared to last quarter with sales down 2.2 percent 2016 Q1 versus 2015 Q4.  However, compared to the same quarter last year (2015 Q1), sales were up 4.2 percent totaling $23.06 billion.

Furniture (excluding Bedding) increased 4.2 percent in the first quarter over 2015 Q1.  First quarter sales fell 4.9 percent below last quarter (2015 Q4).

Bedding sales were also up 5.1 percent over Q1 of last year. Compared to the last quarter (2015 Q4) which is traditionally Bedding’s worst quarter, the first quarter grew 16 percent.

 

Industry Growth Quarter to Quarter 2013 Q1 to 2016 Q1 Furniture & Bedding

 

The chart above shows quarter-over-quarter industry performance from 2013 Q1 through the first quarter of 2016.

First quarter combined Furniture and Bedding industry sales of $23.06 billion were a 4.2 percent improvement over the same Q1 in 2015. Compared to last quarter (2015 Q4) sales declined 2.2 percent.

Furniture (excluding Bedding) increased 4.1 percent in 2016 Q1 versus the same quarter last year with sales of $19.5 billion – up from $18.74 billion in 2015 Q1.

Bedding quarter-over-quarter sales of $3.56 billion, up 5.1 percent over first quarter sales last year.

Industry Sales 2008 YE to 2016 Q1 Furniture & Bedding

Industry sales in the first quarter of 2016 totaled $23.06 billion, an increase of 4.2 percent over the first quarter of last year. 

 

The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores Percent Shift in Home Furnishings Retail Store Characteristics 2007 vs. 2012

The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores Percent Shift in Home Furnishings Retail Store Characteristics 2007 vs. 2012

 

This is the third factoid in a series of five factoids detailing how hard Home Furnishings retail stores were hit across the country during the Recession. The furniture industry suffered greatly due to the collapse of the housing industry and the high unemployment rate. And it has been one of the slowest to dig out. While current data is maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the broad Home Furnishings category, data from the recent Geography release from the 2012 Economic Census shows the impact of the recession on the store types -- Furniture Stores, Home Furnishings Stores, and Floor Covering Stores. 

The data shows that for Furniture and Floor Covering Stores, not only were the store closures significant, but remaining locations also cut back on employees. Furniture stores lost 18 percent of locations, Home Furnishings stores 23.8 percent and Floor Covering stores 21.7 percent.

 

The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores Percent Shift in Number of Establishments by Region 2007 to 2012

 

 

This is the fourth factoid in a series of five factoids detailing how hard Home Furnishings retail stores were hit across the country during the Recession. The furniture industry suffered greatly due to the collapse of the housing industry and the high unemployment rate. And it has been one of the slowest to dig out. While current data is maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the broad Home Furnishings category, data from the recent Geography release from the 2012 Economic Census shows the impact of the recession on the store types -- Furniture Stores, Home Furnishings Stores, and Floor Covering Stores. 

Although store closings were systemic across the country, the Northeastern and the Western states were the hardest hit. Compared to a loss of 13.4 percent of Furniture stores in the South, the West almost doubled that percentage closing 26.2 percent. Meanwhile Floor Covering Stores closed the most doors in the Midwest, 26.7 percent.

 

 

The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores Percent Shift in Number of Establishments and Employees by Store Type and Market Size 2007 vs. 2012

 

 

This is the final factoid in a series of five factoids detailing how hard Home Furnishings retail stores were hit across the country during the Recession. The furniture industry suffered greatly due to the collapse of the housing industry and the high unemployment rate. And it has been one of the slowest to dig out. While current data is maintained by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the broad Home Furnishings category, data from the recent Geography release from the 2012 Economic Census shows the impact of the recession on the store types -- Furniture Stores, Home Furnishings Stores, and Floor Covering Stores.

Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA), Micropolitan Statistical Areas (Micro SA), and Rural Areas all experienced widespread store closures, employee reductions, and decreases in annual payroll 2007 to 2012. Looking at the impact of store closings on markets by industry size, mid-sized markets (under $100 million) tended to fare only slightly better than large markets with over $100 million in industry sales or small Micropolitan Statistical Areas. Furniture Store closing were the least impacted with mid-sized markets faring the best, but still closing 16.1 percent of stores during the 2007 to 2012 period. Meanwhile over 27 percent of Floor Covering stores closed in Micropolitan Statistical Areas.

Furniture Stores were forced to cut almost 30 percent of employees across all markets from 2007 to 2012. Floor Covering Stores had the highest percentage of employee cutbacks - the largest occurring in Micropolitan Statistical Areas with a 38.1 percent drop. Home Furnishing Stores suffered the least amount of employee loss – most likely due to a wider variety of non-furniture merchandise as well as typically smaller store sizes.

The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores Index Growth of Establishments, Employees, and Average Hourly Rates Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores 2007 to 2015

 

This is the second factoid in a series of five factoids detailing how hard Home Furnishings retail stores were hit across the country during the Recession. As a whole the Furniture and Home Furnishings business lost 18 percent of its stores and data from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the number of employees falling 23.6 percent and average hourly earnings decreasing 0.9 percent. Since 2012, the total industry has seen another 3.6 percent loss in stores. However both employment and hourly wages have improved, 6.1 percent and 9.3 percent respectively, signaling an ever-so-slow rebound.

Index Growth in this factoid shows the rapid reduction of stores during the Recession with the total Furniture and Home Furnishings industry dropping from almost 61,000 stores to 48,000 between 2007 and 2015.

Despite the continued loss of stores, hiring is picking up. Although not back to pre-recession levels, the number of employees is steadily increasing from 2012 – up 6.1 percent in 2015. In 2015 the industry employed 465,000 workers, down from 574,000 in 2007.

While average hourly earnings dipped -0.9 percent from 2007 to 2012, wages increased 9.3 percent since 2012 to $19.37– 2015 now exceeding pre-recession (2007) average earnings.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Statistics


The Fall and Slow Rise of Home Furnishing Retail Stores. A Shift in Furniture and Home Furnishings Retail Store Characteristics 2007 – 2012, 2012 – 2015

This is the first factoid in a series of five factoids detailing how hard Home Furnishings retail stores were hit across the country during the Recession. Newly released detailed geography data from the Economic Census conducted throughout 2012 shows that all types of Home Furnishing establishments closed a multitude of stores from 2007 to 2012. No area of the country was left unscathed.

As a whole the Furniture and Home Furnishings business lost 18 percent of its stores and data from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the number of employees falling 23.6 percent and average hourly earnings decreasing 0.9 percent. Since 2012, the total industry has seen another 3.6 percent loss in stores.  However both employment and hourly wages have improved, 6.1 percent and 9.3 percent respectively, signaling an ever-so-slow rebound.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Statistics

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