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From Home Furnishing Business

Publisher's Letter : The Value of Design

At the recent Las Vegas Market, I was in a showroom visiting with a manufacturer. He was showing me the new line the company brought to the show. It was a sharp-looking suit (bedroom, dining, living room – I’ll keep that my secret).

While he was explaining the features and benefits of the product, I casually mentioned a feature I saw on a similar product in another showroom. The feature I mentioned is a definite benefit and could easily be adapted to most any product you see at Market.

It addresses a problem most consumers have had an issue with at some point before. The fix was a very simple one, but one I had never seen. When I mentioned this, the manufacturer said in jest, “Thanks for the tip.” When I heard his response I just paused and thought, “oh damn, I just let the cat out of the bag.” After a couple of seconds, we both chuckled and our conversation began on how long it would take before others in the industry began knocking off this particular feature.

I’m guessing I’ll see it again in High Point at the April Market, but not from my manufacturing friend. He’s far too reputable and classy to blatantly “take” someone’s idea—but there are others, I’m sure, who are implementing this into the design right now.

I’ve heard it said, “Imitation is the highest form of flattery”, but maybe not in this case. Designers spend months working on a concept, picking the right materials and coming up with the perfect lines to create the perfect piece.

Once they are happy with the product, work begins with a manufacturer to produce it. The manufacturer builds and markets it, with hopes of getting it to retailers and in front of the consumer.  A lot of time and effort go into this piece. It was an idea in someone’s head just a few months ago. Now the whole world can see it, draw inspiration from it and well, knock it off.

I’m really not sure how I feel about this. When does a person cross the line from drawing inspiration to outright knocking off an idea? You all have seen a number of bedroom suits with similar designs and features, someone was first up with the idea, so did all others knock it off? Do you or your customer really care? 

I’m guessing the deciding factor is whether or not it moves off your showroom floor; and I’m OK with that. Maybe the original manufacturer that made this piece should have done a better job of marketing this item. They need to make the potential buyer aware of why the original design is hands down a better product.

They have to distinguish a value at that price point. Then, the consumer has a better understanding on why the price point is set as such. As they decide on which product to purchase, original or knock off, maybe that saying “you get what you pay for” will echo in their heads.

This issue of Home Furnishings Business magazine takes a look at intellectual properties and potential issues that could arise from buying and selling copyright infringed goods. Please take some time to read this issue and make sure you aren’t putting your business in a potential situation that you may regret later. 



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